I wonder if…

I wonder if our culture’s readiness to embrace a future where everything is digitalized and lives in the cloud– including our inner lives, with the ubiquity of facebook– comes in part from the way the consumerism of our culture has rendered physical objects flimsy and disposable? And if so, will the adoption of The Cloud be different in different places, different cultures?

 

6 thoughts on “I wonder if…

  1. Kenmore

    I keep coming back to this idea that came to me via Slavoj Zizek, which is that the structure of things determines it’s triumphs and it’s problems, and we have to consider the totality of things when making a judgement on them. For Zizek, saying “the Soviet union was monstrous in some areas, but very effective in others.” is far too easy. Similarly, western free market capitalism cannot/should not be divorced from resource wars in southern Africa. Basically, we shouldn’t be proud of the system’s triumphs if we cannot also acknowledge and make peace with it’s underbelly.

    The connection between that in this next thought is tenuous, I’ll give you that, but they came together, so it felt wrong to only type half of it.

    The internet/the cloud is very good at some things, and that will shape how it’s used, and its triumphs and failures. I can’t imagine what the failures will be at the moment, but here are my thoughts on digital/digitized content.

    So much of my digital shelving space is full of what I might call ‘art’ in one way or another. I have a 1TB external hard drive where I keep my movies and television shows. I keep my writing in the cloud, and I upload my videos to YouTube. If it’s in my basement, the forms of the DVDs, the notebooks of full pages, and published books, the CDs, or cassettes, or pictures on the wall … their forms can distract from the content. (which isn’t to say that the form can’t be part of the content, but you get what I mean)

    I guess what I’m driving at (I’m only just discovering it right now) is that the digital age seems like it will foster artistic intention over meaningless forms/accumulation of stuff. I think that different cultures will/are embracing the internet in different ways, but I think that the internet’s form and its interconnected nature is going to foster a future of general artistry. Through an internet lens, it will matter less about the car one drives or the size of your house, and more about one’s artistic intention and merit.

    And that is my 1 am thought on that. (subject to change with no notice whatsoever)

    Reply
    1. Snazel Post author

      It remains to see though, if the internet will value art enough to pay for it, or simply praise it. It might make a world where everyone is an artist– but only an amateur.

      Reply
      1. Kenmore

        There will definitely be a lot of amateurs living for praise alone, but we’ve already reached a place where certain content creators are living off of advertising and donation buttons, and kickstarter and other crowd-funding sources allow artists to fund their work, if not their lifestyles.

        I think there’s a very bright future for creative types who are creative enough to also innovate in their so-called ‘business model.’

        Reply
        1. Snazel Post author

          I’m not sure if I’m able to make any firm predictions about the future, because we have both the rise of kickstarter and the rise of monolithic bestsellers like 50 Shades of Grey and Girl With The Dragon Tattoo. I’m really not sure if we’re going to end up with a diverse cultural spread of artists, or a massive worldwide popularity contest. Or both. 😀

          Reply

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