The Mockingbirds, Daisy Whitney

Themis Academy is a school for the exceptional students. Athletes, artists, academics, they’re all brought in and placed in a setting where they can thrive. They’re trusted to behave in an honourable manner, The Themis Way, and they do.

Which is why, when Alex makes the mistake of getting blackout drunk at a concert and is date raped, she feels she has nowhere to turn. Who can she tell who will believe her? She was drunk, after all.

But then her friends tell her about the Mockingbirds, a student organization formed to enforce the Themis Way the teachers pretend not to notice any infractions of, and the slow process towards healing begins.

This book made me really uncomfortable, and probably not for the reasons you’re thinking of. I am an older sister of several voracious readers, and they’re always pestering me for recommendations. And as this is obviously an “issue book,” (Defined as the main motivating force for a book being written,) I was very concerned with how the issue was handled. On the actual issue of consent, why it is important, and how it is defined, (especially with the recent Sweden/Assange/Rape brouhahah,) I thought the book did an excellent job, especially since the court scenes allowed people to define their terms in ways which looks like tl;dr in most other cases.

But most of the book is spent in saying over and over that adults WILL NOT help you, in a case like this. Several times Alex says she won’t go to the Police, because her parents will freak out. Ummmmmmm.

I hope it’s clear why that makes me go all snaky. If it isn’t, clearly we are approaching things from different angles, and you should disregard this review entirely.

Granted, by the end of the book Alex had come to trust the “cool” new piano teacher, and comes to talk to her when she has an issue, but so much of the book was spent setting up the idea that adults are all in their own worlds that it felt like an aberration, rather than a eureka moment. I mean, one of her teachers actually has her act out an attempted rape scene. So by the time it got to the reveal that maybe some adults are not finks, I had already written them off, along with much of my enjoyment of the book, regrettably. The way all the students rally behind her is good, but the fact that only, in this world, people within three years of her age are to be trusted not to go off the rails for no real reason, made me pull my hair.

And then: SPOILER ALERT: There’s the issue of the boy she falls for over the course of the book. The romance is all very nice and healing, if it wasn’t for the fact that he’s on the board of the Mockingbirds, and is expressly mentioned as supposed to NOT be in any romantic setting with her. And then at the end: EVEN MORE SPOILERS: Alex is asked to be on the board of the Mockingbirds, who have helped her so much. And her first act is to give the boy an unconditional pardon and ask him to be her advisor. Because apparently the code of conduct when it expressly says, “no fraternizing with people under investigation,” was a grey area. This would have made me go even MORE snaky, if I hadn’t already marked the book up under “not very enjoyable to read.” Maybe it’s because I’ve grown up in a Christian, Military family, (you know those military sorts, so wrapped around the axel about codes of conduct,) but I just think that a.) that wasn’t a grey area, and b.) would it be that hard to hold of the making out for a few months? and c.) if you break the rules you’re very very aware of, shouldn’t there be consequences? /END SPOILERS.

So I gave it three stars out of five. I actually didn’t “like” it that much- if this was based on liking alone it should be two stars- but I do think it’s a very useful teaching book, as long as I made sure to talk about it later. Unfortunately, I’m a very emotional reader and I’m coming from a certain culture and background, so parts of the story swelled WAY out of proportion and coloured my whole experience of reading it. 

With that said, I know the author is a date rape survivor, and that’s why she wrote the book, and it was very well done. Alex’s reactions and healing process was painfully honest, and it ends well. I would like someone I know to read it, and so they can tell me how I was reading it on a bad day and I totally misinterpreted it, and get my head together! Gosh, Jasmine!

Yes, erm, I’m unsure how to end this. Live long and prosper?

2 thoughts on “The Mockingbirds, Daisy Whitney

  1. Bahnree

    Hm. Well, I REALLY wanted to read this book but I am a bit deflated now. HOWEVER I will still get my hands on it and read it and discuss it with you. ^_^

    Reply
  2. Snazel

    Oh, I think you should really, really read it, still. You know how some books just sit there, and you go “mmm, that was wonderful,” and some books just sit there, and you go, “I MUST TALK ABOUT THIS.” This was one of the ones I want to talk about. 😀

    And, you know, you're coming from a different background, and you read differently! Please to review soon. ^_^

    Reply

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