Matched, Ally Condie

Cassia’s world is perfect. Everyone is assigned a job which suits their skills and interests, health care, entertainment, recreation and food are provided by The Society, and they live long, healthy lives. If they decide they want to be married, they are paired with their perfect match, selected from the many thousands of possible people looking for a relationship, and they live happily ever after together.

Just look at Cassia’s parents! Her mother was from the country, and her father was from the city- they never would have met without The Society introducing them to each other. And now, here they are, entirely happy together.

The story starts with Cassia on her way to attend her Match Banquet. To everyone’s surprise and joy, she is matched with someone in her own city, (no moving necessary!) Her best friend Xander will be who she makes her life with, which they are both delighted about. *^_^* (smily face of delight and shyness)

They already know each other so well there’s hardly a need for the data slip with the information about Xander, but since it’s protocol, they both take it, grinning, and then go home to their lives. Everything has worked out even better than they could have hoped for. It’s perfect!

Only, when Cassia goes to look at what The Society has to tell her about Xander, (heh heh heh,) another face flashes on the screen. And again, this is a boy that she knows. Ky, also one of her friends, who also lives on her street, who she also went to school with. She’s reassured that it was just a glitch in the system, which is great, but wait. There are glitches in the system?

The seed has been sown, and Cassia has started to question. She begins to question harder, with more anger, when her grandfather comes to the end of his long and productive life, and dies on his 80th birthday. (Everyone dies on their 80th Birthday.)

Okay, I want to tell you more about this story, but I’m going to stop now, because you deserve to see it unfold with all the well measured care that the author wrote it. I was very impressed with this story, the more so because the only full length review I had read of it said it was internally incoherent and spent too much time explaining the world building. Which I disagree with. ^_^

I thought the voice of the book, as narrated by Cassia, captured her emotional arc wonderfully. At first she’s parroting what she’s been told, (“Everything is perfect!”) and then she’s repeating it desperately, (“This is all good, right?”) and then she’s mocking it, (“Oh, yes, you have our best interests at heart, of COURSE!”) and then she’s just at sea as to what she does next. What do you do to escape in a world where they track your dreams every fourth night? I was particularly impressed because usually I do not notice things like voices of narrators. I’m all GET ME TO THE EXPLOSIONS. GRRR, WHY ARE THINGS NOT ON FIRE?

*cough*

Instead, this time I was able to very happily follow along with the more delicately agonizing realizations Cassia is coming to, and what that means to her. And while I’m talking about the voice, I have to mention that there were three times in the book where I just stopped, amazed at how poetically Ms. Condie managed to phrase the moments of wrenching revelation. And using simple words, too! I mean, the reading level for the book can’t be that high, in terms of vocabulary. It’s “narrated” by someone who lives in a world where art has been simplified down to 100 of everything. And working with simple words, I was still stopped in my reading tracks several times.

Any time a book effects me that much, I am impressed.

And also there were trains and a secret war and sorting things and a strong family which you give up things for. All stories that delight me. You should read this book.

I gave it four stars out of five. I’ll be looking for the sequel. Can I have it now, please?

2 thoughts on “Matched, Ally Condie

  1. Bahnree

    I am so NOT on the dystopian bandwagon. But this sounds kinda like The Giver, which I loved, and, I dunno, your review makes me want to read it. So I suppose I shall. ^_^

    Reply
  2. Snazel

    Yay, my review was successful! 😀

    it was rather like The Giver, and also not. I mean, it was dealing with some of the same themes, (control, choice, right to life,) but it handled it very differently. I am quite interested to see if you'll like it. 😀

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